A Curious Army Wife

I joined this crazy tribe when I married into the Indian Army

Archive for the tag “Indian Army”

9 Reasons why Maggi and Fauj are made for each other

Army maggi

We all had a harrowing time when Maggi was banned. What a relief that it’s coming back to reunite with her beloved fauji.

I keep reading about how much Maggi means more to everyone that probably a lot of other meaningful things (I am not judging them, cos I am a Maggiholic myself). But Indian Army loves Maggi like crazy. Why is Maggi such an important part of fauji life and why do faujis miss the yellow packets at CSD Canteen?

If the nation wants to know, then know nation shall.

I can think of 9 instances where faujis and Army wives find solace in Maggi’s noodley comfort.

1. When the Mess runs out of food for every-hungry cadets of the National Defence Academy, then what saves the day for them? Maggi, of course! And the preparation would put even hard core life-hackers to shame. Since cadets at NDA are not allowed to keep an electric kettle or a gas burner with them in their rooms, their inner-Einstein invented a new way of cooking Maggi.

The elaborate process involves a cadet first peeking out of his room to make sure there are no officers and senior term cadets anywhere around the room. Once that is ensured, the door is locked securely, out comes the mess tin issued to every cadet, and an iron.

The iron is balanced between books in upside-down position (so that the hot surface faces upwards) and acts like a hot plate. Mix water, masala and Maggi in the mess tin and keep it on the hot iron. Call up your girlfriend and talk for 15-20 minutes. (Yes, the Curious Army Wife knows this). Once the Maggi is cooked (well, almost), the cadets make some lame excuse to hang up and I lie not when I say that all it takes is just 10 seconds for the mess tin to be empty again! Viola!

Maggi and Anda Bhurji -- the ultimate military combo.

Maggi and Anda Bhurji — the ultimate military combo.

2. NDA traditions often get carried on to various other institutions like Indian Military Academy (Dehradun), Naval Academy and the Air Force Academy (Hyderabad). So All-India coverage of iron-mess tin-Maggi is ensured by our future officers.

3. Young officers often miss their three-course meals in the Mess to go to that Maggi shop that serves every possible variation of Maggi. Major Sa’ab swears by the cheese Maggi he survived on during his YOs in Mhow.

4. The flamboyant officers often go out on dates but end up returning home with their stomach still growling — all because the damsel wanted to go out dancing or check out the new pizza place. The fauji would obviously not want to scare the girl off by eating much much much more than her. So he returns home, calls up his sahayak, who runs off to the Mess to get hot and soupy Maggi! Fauji trupt hue!

5. Enough of this. How can Army wives lag behind in this Maggi eating-spree. She gets her first taste of fauji Maggi when she gets married and joins her husband for the first time in a peace station. More often than not, it takes from a few days to a few months for a house to get allotted to them. Till then, khana-peena is done in the Mess. But one fine day the lady would say, “I am sick and tired of dressing up for meals. I want to eat in my pajamas and I WANT MAGGI!”

6. Then when the couple is allotted a house, the new-age digital wife is obviously going to spend more time on Facebook and Watsapp (and my blog) than in the kitchen. She then suddenly realises that it is 1300hrs already and she hasn’t prepared lunch. Koi tension nai, Maggi hai na! Maggi

7. The sleepy couple doze off at night only to be woken up at around midnight by the sound of the doorbell. A normal civilian family would obviously panic. Who could it be at this hour? Is everything alright? But a fauji couple never gets anxious. They wake up and open the door (without¬† looking through the peep-hole or asking who’s there) because they know there is a pack of hungry young officers (and ladies too) waiting outside for a midnight party! Don’t worry, this is common practice in fauj. Now the pack has to be fed.

Had it been 1970s, the lady of the house would have promptly prepared aloo ke parathe or something like that. But not our aaj-ki naari.

She knows the short cuts, and Maggi is the shortest of the cuts. In fact the Curious Army Wife is always on a lookout for the easy way out! Four packets and some veggies are enough to feed the pack. The group leaves happy and satisfied… at around 0300hrs.

8. The wife is visiting her parents in another city. The officer is at home studying for some godforsaken test. He misses his wife and her food. The maid is there to cook, but her daal is not as good as his wife’s. After putting in a few hours of studying, the officer gets up, enters the kitchen and makes the only thing he can make in there — Maggi. If there is one thing he can make right from his academy days, it is Maggi. He slurps the last strand of the noodle and goes back to his desk to fall asleep on top of his books.

Cook a tricoloured recipe. Ye lo ji Tiranga Maggi!

Cook a tricoloured recipe. Ye lo ji Tiranga Maggi!

9. Somewhere up there on mountain is a group of Jawans on their regular duty. They are thousands of kilometres away from home. Huddled up around a small fire to keep them warm, they often have chai and Maggi as a quick evening snack. Maggi might not take 2-minutes to cook, but it takes less than 1 minute for that Jawan to gobble it down. And then it’s business as usual.

Asha School student Laxmi excels in Special Olympics

Kudos to Laxmi Kumari, who won medals for India in Special Olympics recently. FYI, she is a product of the Asha Special Children School, which is run by the Indian Army (or is it AWWA?). I am so proud of her.

I also made a mental note to encourage someone to follow in her footsteps if I ever visit any Asha school. I’ve pasted the news piece from Assam Tribune that appeared on August 6, 2015 below. (I think they have used the PTI press release).

Waiting to know more about Laxmi and many more from Asha Schools who are doing well in their field. Bravo Laxmi!

__________________________________________

Assam Tribune

City girl shines in Special Olympics

GUWAHATI, Aug 6 – Laxmi Kumari, a student of Asha Special Children School, Narangi Cantonment here won one gold medal in soft ball and one silver medal in the 50-metre race in the Special Olympics World Summer Games, held in Los Angeles, USA from July 20 to August 2.

She was given a grand welcome at the Lokapriya Gopinath Bardoloi International Airport here by her fans and admirers when she arrived in the city today. This was stated in a press release. Laxmi Kumari joined the special school, run by the Army, at the age of seven with mild mental retardation and spinal disabilities. But with her sheer grit and determination and the efforts of the school, she not only started normal physical activities, but also keenly participated in various sports events.

In the past, she has won a gold medal in badminton singles, one silver medal in badminton doubles and one silver medal in badminton mixed doubles in the Special Olympics held in New Castle, Australia in December 2013.

She also won one gold medal in badminton singles and one silver medal in badminton mixed doubles in the National Championship of Special Olympic Bharat held in Mumbai in July 2014.

First packing experience. What a pain!

Though we hate the way our houses smell in the monsoon, there is still no builder in India who can match this amazing view from an Army quarter's balcony.

Though we hate the way our houses smell in the monsoon, there is still no builder in India who can match this amazing view from an Army quarter’s balcony.

And I am back… ūüôā

Not that I was missed, I know. But it still feels great to write “I am back”, for purely selfish reasons with which I won’t bore you.

So it’s been almost two months that I haven’t written anything. I was caught up in the cycle of dining outs – friendly dinners – packing – loading trucks –¬†saying goodbyes – crying¬†my eyes out – travelling – waiting for the bloody trucks – unloading – unpacking – setting¬†up¬†a new house – blah blah.

This entire cycle is what a seasoned Army wife usually gets used to after a couple of postings. But I was new to this whole process and it was freaky to say the least. I am glad it is over.

The day we¬†finally saw the MES guy put locks on the house (quarter in sarkari and fauji lingo),¬†we¬†had¬†moved in with¬†Major Sa’ab’s coursemate and his wife¬†in the same Cantt for two days. As my friend and I were enjoying the drizzle and drinking tea on the balcony, we saw a Dhai-Ton (colloquial for the two-and-half tons capacity¬†Army trucks) pull¬†up in the block.

Two fit jawans¬†quickly started unloading stuff from the truck…aah…so another family was moving in. It was not my house, but still I felt a sense of possessiveness¬†about it.¬†How soon we all get attached to the leaky, dingy and¬†ancient Army quarters¬†was the first thing that dawned on me. Army wives have this incredible knack for¬†accepting any house with open arms and making¬†it their own for the next two weeks (or two months or two years…whatever).

This first packing-moving experience¬†has taught us (Major Sa’ab and I)¬†a lot¬†but I still know that our second time is going to be equally chaotic. I just know it. Don’t ask me how ūüôā .

Kamar kass ke!

Innovation is the mother of.....

This should be a part of life hacks lessons. ‘

So there we were, dancing at the IMA Ball in Dehradun, where future officers training at the Indian Military Academy have a gala time before military service beckons, and this strange thing caught my eye.

I wish I had taken a better picture. But there is only so much I can do with a normal camera phone that refuses to click decent pics in low light.

All the Gentlemen Cadets (better known as GC) were dressed in their muftis, a dress code set for such fun events in the Indian Army. Their ball partners were dressed in some of the most stylish western outfits fashioned out of a one metre cloth (of course I am exaggerating, it’s my blog after all :P).

The ball party had just started off and there was this group of young girls and GCs dancing in front of us. Suddenly I realised that the kamar-band of this GC’s uniform looked a little odd. I normally do not go closer to take a look of what is hanging off a person’s belt, but in this case I had to, cause (a) it was dark and (b) I had left my glasses at home.

There was this sparkly-sequency-golden clutch purse securely held by the GCs kamar-band. His partner would obviously have thought it would be cool to get this clutch but must have realised what a pain it is to handle it while dancing. So I am guessing our GC gulped down a glass of chivalry and offered to get rid of this object in this unique fashion,

Unique my foot. My awe for his innovative idea evaporated the moment I spotted around 10-12 more GCs with a clutch purse snuck in their kamar-bands. Aah, so even they wanted the purse out of their way, it seems. ūüôā

Protecting everyone!

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This is a picture taken by Capt Sa’ab, who was recently out for a camp with a bunch of other faujis. The day they landed at the camp site they realised they had some unusual guests. Three kittens living in the barracks had accidently gotten themselves packed with the men’s stuff! Well, needless to say, the men were given orders to feed them and keep them safe.

Now anyone who has had even a day’s experience with cats will tell you that CATS DON’T TAKE ORDERS. Period. You tell them to eat this, stay there, sit here, walk there, sleep now, wake up later… they will simply ignore you and do whatever they want to. So the men found it very difficult to keep them in the campsite, just in case the officers came to check!

Needless to say, the men managed to get all of them back at the end of their week-long camp. Mama Kitty, you owe the men in olive greens big time!

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